Are blue eyes intimidating

Rated 3.89/5 based on 920 customer reviews

This doesn't mean that every dog of that breed will develop those diseases; it just means that they're at an increased risk.If you're buying a puppy, it's a good idea to find out which genetic illnesses are common to the breed you're interested in, so you can ask the breeder about the physical health of your potential pup's parents and other relatives.Do you have young kids, throw lots of dinner parties, play in a garage band, or lead a hectic life? See Dogs That Have Low Sensitivity Levels Some breeds bond very closely with their family and are more prone to worry or even panic when left alone by their owner.An anxious dog can be very destructive, barking, whining, chewing, and otherwise causing mayhem.Consider whether you have the time and patience for a dog that needs a lot of grooming, or the money to pay someone else to do it.

If you want a heat-sensitive breed, the dog will need to stay indoors with you on warm or humid days, and you'll need to be extra cautious about exercising your dog in the heat.See Dogs That Are More Shy If you're going to share your home with a dog, you'll need to deal with some level of dog hair on your clothes and in your house.However, shedding does vary greatly among the breeds: Some dogs shed year-round, some "blow" seasonally -- produce a snowstorm of loose hair -- some do both, and some shed hardly at all.Contrary to popular belief, small size doesn't necessarily an apartment dog make — plenty of small dogs are too high-energy and yappy for life in a high-rise.Being quiet, low energy, fairly calm indoors, and polite with the other residents, are all good qualities in an apartment dog.

Leave a Reply